BEN COVE

 
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Studio Visit interview with Morgan Quaintance
Resonance FM
 
studio_visit
 
5-6pm on Sunday 10th Januaury 2016
Resonance 104.4FM & DAB in London | online at www.resonancefm.com


An interview with Morgan Quaintance for Studio Visit - an hour-long, interviews-based radio programme, featuring international contemporary artists, writers, theorists and musicians. Broadcast weekly on Resonance 104.4FM and online at www.resonancefm.com

A popcast will be available after broadcast at www.studiovisitshow.com

Morgan Quaintance is a London-based writer, musician, broadcaster and curator. Born in South London, he is a regular contributor to Art Monthly, Art Review, Frieze, Rhizome.org and a number of curatorial sites and blogs. He is a contributing editor for E-Flux’s online publishing portal Art Agenda, is a founding member of the curatorial collective DAM PROJECTS, and is the 2015/16 curatorial fellow at Cubitt Gallery, London. As a presenter he currently works with the BBC’s flagship arts programme The Culture Show, and is also the producer of Studio Visit, a weekly hour-long interviews-based programme, broadcast on Resonance 104.4 FM, featuring international contemporary artists as guests.

www.resonancefm.com
www.studiovisitshow.com


Now available to listen at:
https://studiovisitshow.files.wordpress.com/2015/12/ben-cove_studio_visit.mp3
 
 
 
The Fold
curated by Charley Peters
 
Blyth Gallery,
Exhibition Rd,
Kensington,
London,
SW7 5NH

15 Jun - 8 July 2016

Jane Bustin / Ben Cove / Deb Covell / Clive ‘Hanz’ Hancock’ / Tara Langford / Patrick Morrissey / Charley Peters / Guilia Ricci

The outside is not a fixed limit but a moving matter animated by peristaltic movements, folds and foldings that together make up an inside: they are not something other than the outside, but precisely the inside of the outside.
Gilles Deleuze

The Fold explores the dimensional properties of the drawn and painted surface through the notion of folded space. Using elemental materials such as paper, ink, graphite, wood and paint, The Fold will explore the deconstruction of the image plane and examine the materiality of physical or implied interruptions in the constructed surface.

When we speak, air folds in front of us to carry our words; geological folding creates mountain ranges and other disruptions to the earth’s surface; newspapers and websites prioritise the most important content to be ‘above the fold’. In philosophy the concept of ‘the fold’ allowed Deleuze to think creatively about the formation of subjectivity, and in addition about the possibilities for the construction of a ‘non-human’ subjectivity. Deleuze’s fold counteracts archetypical accounts of subjectivity that suppose a straightforward interiority and exteriority, depth and surface. He wrote about a world that can be interpreted as a body of infinite folds and surfaces that twist and weave through compressed time and space. The action of folding is a temporal and spatial process that becomes material. The fold is a boundary, a line, a structure and a point of collapse.

In The Fold works have been developed through a process of transferring activity back and forth between two and three dimensions, creating a dialogue between inside and outside, solid and void, foreground and background. The artists are engaged with physical exploration of materials, a dialogue with space and/or systematic methods of optically challenging the fixed surface. The Fold would reposition the binary definitions of flatness and depth, and in turn suggest a spatial interrogation of the disciplines of drawing and painting.
 
 
 
Modern Language
solo exhibition
 
 
Peter von Kant Gallery
25 Tanners Hill
London
SE8 4PJ

Opening 25th September 6-9pm
26th September - 7th November 2015

Thursday to Saturday 12–6pm
or by appointment

New & recent work.
An essay by George Vasey written to accompany the show can be read here >

petervonkant.com
artsy.net/peter-von-kant
 
 
 
A Putting Down of Roots
co-curated by Clarise Foster & Kegan McFadden
 
September 17 - November 14, 2015

Gallery 1C03
1st floor, Centennial Hall, The University of Winnipeg
515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg MB R3B 2E9
Canada

Ben Cove, Hock E Aye VI Edgar Heap of Birds, Divya Mehra, Natasha Peterson, Erdem Taşdelen, Lawrence Weiner, John Will, and Laurel Woodcock.

A Putting Down of Roots was the title of the first editorial authored by the late Dorothy Livesay for CV2 in 1975 and has been adopted as the title for this anniversary project. This exhibition comprises a selection of text-based works.

At their heart, these pieces grapple with the understanding of time in its multiplicity. Within the backdrop of CV2’s 40th anniversary, this grouping of artwork purposely overstates the literary affect used by contemporary artists. From the use of actual text and words to literary allusion, these works problematize issues related to larger understandings of how time passes, the placement of the artist in culture, and the relevance to celebratory misreading in particular. Intergenerational and cross-cultural, the artists included in this exhibition represent various starting points to the same end – that of literature and the use of text. Whether through reveries, reference, or repetition, these works are brought together to state an openness to the text. Each of the works are purposely selected to play double-duty in terms of incorporating language, but also some literary reference or underscoring of the history of publishing from the personal to the mechanical. Gallery 1C03 wishes to acknowledge financial assistance for this programming from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Winnipeg Arts Council.
 
 
 
ARCHIVE
 
 
The London Open at the Whitechapel Gallery
selected by Angela de la Cruz, Nicoletta Fiorucci, Ben Luke, Jake Miller, Daniel Herrmann, Poppy Bowers
 
whitechapel_gallery_ben_cove
 
Whitechapel Gallery
77-82 Whitechapel High St
London
E1 7QX

PV: 7-9pm 14th July 2015
15 July – 6 September 2015

Free Entry
Monday Closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/coming-soon-london-open/

Rebecca Ackroyd, Holly Antrum, Ryuji Araki, Salvatore Arancio, Zehra Arslan, Alexander Baczynski-Jenkins, Sam Belinfante, Karl Bielik, Isha Bøhling, Jane Bustin, Jodie Carey, Ben Cove, Sam Curtis, Nelmarie Du Preez, Alexander Duncan, Tim Ellis, Adham Faramawy, Gaia Fugazza, Marco Godoy, Lothar Götz, Athene Greig, Buster Grimes, Mark Harris, Emma Hart, Dominic Hawgood, Mary Hurrel, Lucy Joyce, Dominic Kennedy, Sophie Mackfall, Damian Meade, Guy Patton, The Grantchester Pottery, Heather Power, Mary Ramsden, Sarah Roberts, Julie Roch-Cuerrier, Mitra Saboury, Lizi Sanchez, Laura Santamaria, Frances Scott, Eva Stenram, Tim Stoner, Roy Voss, Caroline Walker, Dominic Watson, Brian and Demelza Watts, Ben Woodeson and Madalina Zaharia

Sculpture, painting, performance, moving image, photography, printmaking and many other media and practices showcase some of the most dynamic work being made across the capital in 2015.

From a record number of 2,133 applicants, 48 artists have been selected by a panel of high profile art world figures, including writer and critic Ben Luke, artist Angela de la Cruz, collector Nicoletta Fiorucci, gallerist Jake Miller and Whitechapel Gallery curators Daniel Herrmann, Eisler Curator and Head of Curatorial Studies and Poppy Bowers, Assistant Curator.
 
 
 
Three Works
curated by Chris Shaw
 
 
Three Works
2nd Floor
8 Trinity Street
Weymouth
Dorset
DT4 8TW

21st August - 11th September, 2015

7 solo shows comprising of 3 works per show.

http://threeworks.org
 
 
 
Indefinable Cities - Japan
curated by Anna Francis and Yoshida Koh
 
 

20 July, 2015 – 2 August, 2015

Art Takahashi
Hikone,
Shiga,
Japan

https://www.facebook.com/pages/高橋美術/517315321731013

The exhibition explores the development of cities worldwide, and in particular looks to capture the way that artists are responding to and documenting Cities in flux, and more; how artists impact on their environments and the regeneration of Cities.

AirSpace Gallery and Tsukiyo to Syonen (Osaka, Japan) are working together to realise this ambitious project which forms a dialogue between artists in Japan and the UK, to explore the nature of artist-led activity in the two countries. The two organisations have strong visual arts programmes, but in addition, have shared interests in exploring the interface between art and environmental concerns, regeneration, development and citizenship. The ‘Indefinable Cities’ project provides an opportunity to form a dialogue around this area of practice, and creates a space for International Conversations around the role that artists may have in contributing to the development of healthy, happy cities and what it means to have a socially engaged practice as an artist.
 
 
 
In Schönheit Auferstehen (Resurrect in Beauty)
curated by Bernd Wurlitzer
 
 
Galerie Patrick Ebensberger
Plantagenstrasse 30
13347 Berlin
Germany

PV 2nd May2015

Radu Belcin, Emanuel Bornstein, GL Brierley, Ben Cove, Axel Geis, Lennart Grau, Michael Kunze, Ernie Luley, Lee Marshall, Jonathan Meese, Flavia Pitis, Michael Samuels, Jurgen Teller, Markus Vater, Jo Wilmot


www.ebensperger.net
 
 
 
Autocatalytic Future Games
curated by Playpaint
 
no format Gallery
Second Floor Studios & Arts
Harrington Way
London SE18 5NR

11th - 20th June 2015
PV 10th June

http://autocatalyticfuturegames.co.uk/
http://www.noformat.co.uk
 
 
 
Ben Cove & Kate Terry: Plane to Line to Point
curated by Giovanna Paternó
 
 
dalla Rosa Gallery
121 Clerkenwell Road
London EC1R 5BY

PV: Thursday 23 April
24 April - 23 May

http://www.dallarosagallery.com/upcoming-exhibition/


“As we gradually tear the point out of its restricted sphere of customary influence, its inner attributes - which were silent until now - make themselves heard more and more. One after the other, these qualities - inner tensions - come out of the depths of its being and radiate their energy. [...] The dead point becomes a living thing.”

(Wassily Kandinsky, Point and Line to Plane, published by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation New York, 1947)

Ben Cove and Kate Terry have been unintentionally collaborating to shape this two-person exhibition, their practices complement each-other so well that one would assume some kind of exchange has taken place, while in reality they worked almost unaware of each-other. Powdery paints and neon-bright lines are the building blocks for both artists: Cove mixes them with a juxtaposition of almost recognisable elements often borrowed from design and architecture, whereas Terry defines delicate geometries with painted wooden structures supported by a system of threads.

The starting point for Cove's work – both paintings and sculptures – comes from a bank of historic photographic images from a variety of sources: architecture, furniture, artefacts, interior spaces and depictions of the body. Nothing is lifted directly, but much is insinuated or suggested. In a series of micro essays George Vasey considered Cove's paintings and concluded that they “invoke a particular strand of Modernist Abstraction. If Modernism was a response to its own era's technological advancements (aviation, industrialism, and the machine) then Cove's paintings are at once heraldic and diagrammatic, provisional yet monumental. We could be looking at an unbuilt home, a logo for a multinational corporation or simply two lines intersecting within a nebulous environment.”

Kate Terry's practice encompasses sculpture, installation and drawing, exploring the relationships of points, lines, angles, and forms from their defining conditions. She employs utilitarian materials with economy and restraint, often disrupting our perception of depth, and of shapes and structures in space. Terry's sculptural works consider concerns of weight and presence with direct emphasis on their physicality. These geometric abstractions are reduced to succinct lines and planes of colour, and are often physically tethered by Terry to the spaces they occupy; tied by threads or propped, wedged and suspended from walls and corners.

Full Press Release PDF >
 
 
Indefinable Cities
curated by Anna Francis
 
Rebecca Chesney, Ben Cove, Daiki Murakami, Ayaka Nishi, Emily Speed, Hirofumi Suzuki

 
Airspace Gallery
Stoke-on-Trent
April 10th- May 23rd 2015
touring to various venues in Osaka, Japan

Indefinable Cities is an exhibition taking place in Stoke-on-Trent, England and in 6 Cities in Japan. The exhibition explores the development of cities worldwide, and in particular looks to capture the way that artists are responding to and documenting Cities in flux, and more; how artists impact on their environments and the regeneration of Cities.

AirSpace Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent, England and Tsukiyo to Syonen in Osaka, Japan are working together to realise this ambitious project which forms a dialogue between artists in Japan and the UK, to explore the nature of artist-led activity in the two countries. The two organisations have strong visual arts programmes, but in addition, have shared interests in exploring the interface between art and environmental concerns, regeneration, development and citizenship. The ‘Indefinable Cities’ project provides an opportunity to form a dialogue around this area of practice, and creates a space for International Conversations around the role that artists may have in contributing to the development of healthy, happy cities and what it means to have a socially engaged practice as an artist.


 
 
Contemporary British Abstraction
curated by Terry Greene &Matthew Macaulay
 
David Ainley, Ralph Anderson, Ellen Baker, Dominic Beattie, Andrew Bick, Katrina Blannin, Claudia Boese, Julian Brown, EC, Ben Cove, Clem Crosby, Pen Dalton, Lisa Denyer, Andrew Graves, Terry Greene, Susan Gunn, Sue Kennington, Sarah R Key, Phoebe Mitchell, Matthew Macaulay, Ellie MacGarry, Katrin Maeurich, Sarah McNulty, Mali Morris, Aimee Parrott, Marion Piper, Clare Price, Gwennan Thomas, Trevor Sutton, David Webb, Mary Webb, Gary Wragg
 
23rd Feb - 11th April 2015
PV 3rd March 6-8pm

SE9 Container Gallery
Greenwich
London
 
 
 
Demimonde
curated by Alex Meurice (Slate Projects)
 
 
Alex Ball, Peter Çan Bellamy, Lewis Betts, Skyler Brickley, Jack Brindley, Ross M Brown, Matthew Cheale, Joel Chima, James Collins, Ben Cove, Tom Farthing, Robin Friend, Aaron Gilbert, Daniel Gordon, Rae Hicks, Michael Iveson, Egle Jauncems, Nick Jensen, Lee Marshall, Rob McKenzie, Nadège Mériau, Ana Milenkovic, Adele Morse, Sean Mullan, Rosa Nussbaum, Christopher Page, Charley Peters, Miroslav Pomichal, Terry Ryu Kim, Tom Savery, Pablo Smidt,
 
Amberwood House
17A Thurloe Place
London
SW7 2SA
(opposite the V&A)

Sat 10th January - Sun 18h January , open daily 11-6pm

www.slateprojects.com
www.mottahedan.com
 
 
 
Vulpes Vulpes Open 2014
 
 
Arthur Gray, Alex Duncan, Ben Cove, Bob Gelsthorpe, Charlie G Thomas, Yumi Chung, Claire Lavender, David Farrar, Diego Delas, Dakota Gearhart, Dave Charlesworth, Emilia Moisio, Hannah Clarkson, Jonny JJ Winter, Justyna Kabala, Kirsty Harris, Linda Persson, Lizi Sanchez, Laura Yuile, Lindsey Mendick , Louise Chivers, Patrick James, Tara Langford, Vasilis Asimakopoulos.

PV 7th November 6 - 9pm
8th - 30th November
Fri/Sat/Sun 12 - 6pm

Vulpes Vulpes
17 Blue Anchor Lane
London.
SE16 3UL

http://vulpesvulpes.org

 
 
 
Tomb, Shrine, Survey-Marker, Spare-Part
curated by Lucy A Sames
 
 
Sam Austen | Ben Cove | Karen David | Cathy Haynes | Lawrence Lek | Superlative TV

'Tomb, Shrine, Survey-Marker, Spare-Part' considers sculptural objects as tacit communication devices that transcend verbal language, taking John McCracken's minimalist sculptural 'planks' as the starting point. McCracken understood these works as technological devices enabling remote-viewing and communication with extraterrestrials through the objects' latent qualities and pure form. The quasi-religious appearance of a similar plank (rumoured to be a McCracken) in Stanley Kubrick's 2001 A Space Odyssey details the physical ratio of this monolith's dimensions as 1:4:9 - the squares of the first three integers - a quality that communicates through sculptural form, the scientific intelligence of its (extraterrestrial) creators - the sculptural object becomes standing stone.

26th September - 25th October
PV 6pm - late, 26th Sept 2014

Enclave
Resolution Way
London
SE8 4NT

www.enclaveprojects.com

Nominated for the ArtQuest Workweek prize
http://www.artquest.org.uk/articles/view/workweek_prize

This is Tomorrow - review
thisistomorrow.info/articles/tomb-shrine-survey-marker-spare-part
 
 
 
Screen Space
curated by Alex Meurice & Alex Ball
 
ALEX BALL | GORDON CHEUNG | BEN COVE | CHRISTOPHER HANLON | THOMAS HUTTON | CHRIS PAGE | MARTINE POPPE | LUKE RUDOLF

Screen Space is a group exhibition dealing with the construction of space in contemporary painting in terms of a folding and unfolding between flatness and depth.

Taking its cue from two manifestations of the screen, that of the digital monitor or interface and the dividing concertina used in room interiors, it considers the notion of surface in terms of both display and partition. The exhibition will explore how the processual logic of painting often reflects the pictorial language and mode of image distribution of its times, in this case the logic of the computer screen, with its multiple and simultaneous windows and frames, and its effects of transparency, fades, blushes, modulated gesture and conflicting passages of depth. For paintings that explore screen space in this way, the flat surface is not conducive with the autonomy and specificity of painting as elaborated by Clement Greenberg. Flatness refers instead to a shifting of layers, which create a tension between the illusion of the image and the limiting surface. It is this tension, this fluctuation or pull back and forth between spatial qualities, flatness and surface texture that makes painting’s relationship with these notions of the screen so generative.

30th Sept - 10th Oct 2014

PICKLE FACTORY, BETHNAL GREEN, LONDON E8

www.slateprojects.com
 
 
 
(detail)
curated by Andrew Bracey
 
H Project Space
Bangkok - June 2014

Transition Gallery
London - September 2014

Usher Gallery
Lincoln February - April 2015

http://www.hgallerybkk.com/


118 painters submit a photographic detail of a painting to create one large collaged installation.

Alexis Harding, Alli Sharma, Andrew Bick, Andrew Seto, Andrew Stahl, Annabel Dover, Annabelle Sheldon, Ben Cove, Benet Spencer, Cathy Lomax, Damien Meade, Dan Hays, Dan Perfect, Daniel Sturgis, David Dipre, David Manley, David Reed, David Ryan, Eleanor Moreton, Emma Talbot, Enzo Marra, Fiona Curran, Fiona Macdonald. G L Brierley, Geraint Evans, Gordon Cheung, Gordon Dalton, Hannah Knox, Henny Acloque, Henrietta Simson, Iain Andrews, Isabel Young, Jamie Oliver, Jennifer Maidment, John Rimmer, Julie Heffernan, Jamie Shovlin, Katie Pratt, Katrina Blannin, Lesley Halliwell, Louise Bristow, Mark Kennard, Mark Wright, Medina Hammad, Mick Finch, Miho Sato, Mik Godley, Mimei Thompson, Narbi Price, Natasha Kidd, Neal Rock, Olivia Notaro, Pavel Büchler, Rachel Lumsden, Rick Copsey, Robert Holyhead, Rosalind Davis, Steve Dutton, Steve Ingman, Terry Shave, Thomas Wright, Tristram Aver, Yelena Popova, and more...
 
 
 
Paint Britain
curated by Robert Priseman
 
Ipswich Art School Gallery,
1 Upper High Street,
Ipswich,
IP1 3QH

15th Nov 2014 - 15th March 2015
Tuesday - Sunday, 10am - 5pm

http://www.cimuseums.org.uk/article/10725/Ipswich-Art-School


David Ainley, Julian Brown, Simon Carter, Ben Cove, Pen Dalton, Lisa Denyer, Sam Douglas, Annabel Dover, Natalie Dowse, Fiona Eastwood, Nathan Eastwood, Wendy Elia, Paul Galyer, Terry Greene, Susan Gunn, Alex Hanna, Marguerite Horner, Barbara Howey, Linda Ingham, Sue Kennington, Matthew Krishanu, Bryan Lavelle, Monica Metsers, Nick Middleton, Andrew Munoz, Stephen Newton, Gideon Pain, Ruth Philo, Alison Pilkington, Robert Priseman, Freya Purdue, Katherine Russell, David Sullivan, Harvey Taylor, Judy Tucker, Julie Umerle, Mary Webb, Sean Williams
 
 
 
Contemporary British Painting
curated by Robert Priseman
 
Huddersfield Art Gallery
Princess Alexandra Walk
Huddersfield
HD1 2SU

1st November 2014 - 31st March 2015

Monday-Friday: 10am - 5pm | Saturday: 10am - 4pm | Sunday: Closed

60 works from the Priseman-Seabrook Collection of 21st Century British Painting

http://www.robert-priseman.com/museum-collections/priseman-seabrook-collection-21st-century-british-painting/